Oops... We have a (SUGAR) problem

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THE PROBLEM

Fruits and vegetables contain, from within, high levels of sucrose, glucose, and, fructose. For example, a cup of freshly squeezed orange juice contains the SAME amount of sugars as a can of sweetened soda. 
 

Therefore, the notion

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is often misleading.

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THE SOLUTION

ZIS Food science transforms popular sugar-rich food & beverages into healthier, low-sugar products, without affecting the brand’s taste.

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100% natural…
...NOT a guarantee for health.

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YOUR QUESTIONS, OUR ANSWERS

RARE SUGARS? NEVER HEARED ABOUT THEM...


Like Sucrose, Glucose and Fructose, Allulose, Tagatose and Allose are naturally occurring sugars. Allulose can be found in figs, kiwis and raisins. Tagatose in dairy products, and Allose in the leaves of the African shrub protea rubropilosa. While Sucrose, Glucose and Fructose are abundant in nature, Allulose, Tagatose and Allose are considered rare sugars since they are frustratingly scarce.




WHY RARE SUGARS?


We believe that natural low-calorie rare sugars offer a viable, highly attractive alternative to both refined sugars and current alternative sweeteners. Although natural low-calorie sugars have been known for over 70 years, they are frustratingly rare. Among them, the rare sugar D-allulose is chemically nearly identical to common sugars. Furthermore, allulose exhibits a very similar taste profile, consistency, heat-response profile, and interactions with other food ingredients to those of sucrose. Remarkably, allulose has less than 5% of the per-weight calorie value of sucrose, and it does not affect blood glucose or insulin levels. Lastly, a recent FDA decision to exclude allulose from total and added sugar counts has made allulose (and potentially other rare sugars) the most desirable known sugar substitute.




I HAVE DIABETES, ARE RARE SUGARS SAFE TO CONSUME?


In contrast to other sugar replacement solutions, rare sugars have virtually no effect on blood glucose or insulin levels. According to the FDA, both are considered safe to consume for all populations, including diabetic patients. In fact, extensive scientific evidence demonstrates that rare sugars can actually positively affect our health. Allulose, for example, can reduce the absorption of other sugars, elevate glycogen synthesis, improve glucose and insulin response, and induce fat oxidation.




WHY NOT USE STEVIA OR ASPARTAME INSTEAD?


The primary solution to date in terms of replacements/alternatives for refined sugars are low-calorie high-intensity sweeteners (HISs, such as aspartame and stevia). Yet these suffer from several problems: (1) Unlike sucrose (table sugar), most HISs are hyper-sweet, and they often possess an objectionable aftertaste. (2) Natural and artificial sweeteners are chemically different from sucrose, resulting in a different consistency, heat-response profile, and interactions with other food ingredients. These differences mean that existing recipes and food-manufacturing processes must be radically altered when replacing sucrose with a HIS. (3) Recent years have seen increased public awareness of food quality, a growing demand for sustainable manufacturing, and, equally important, an objection to the use of chemically manufactured food additives, including HISs. These issues highlight the need for new economical, clean label, environmentally friendly natural replacements for sucrose.




I DON'T CONSUME SUGAR.  WHY DOES THIS MATTER TO ME?


While you may be jumping on the bandwagon of the newest low-sugar diet craze, the truth is it’s actually quite challenging to avoid consumption of added sugars. There are 61 different names for sugar used by F&B companies, which makes it easy to hide sugar in plain sight. Moreover, the use of added sugar is very common and covers a wide range of products. In the US for example, 74% of the packaged food found at your local store contains added sugar.




OK, I'M CONVINCED, SO WHERE CAN I BUY THEM?


We are not going to sell rare sugars. ZIS is a biotech venture that develops an enzyme-based technological platform capable of converting everyday sugars into low- to no-calorie rare sugars (e.g., allulose, tagatose, allose, and other) in a cost-effective manner. Our technological solutions are expected to be readily implemented with existing production lines (Plug and Play)—positively impacting the sugar industry and numerous food and beverage production lines. Soon enough you will be able to enjoy from unprecedented standards of healthy, low-sugar foodstuff. Just search for our label "ZIS inside".