YOUR QUESTIONS, OUR ANSWERS

RARE SUGARS? NEVER HEARED ABOUT THEM...

Like Glucose and Fructose, Allulose, Tagatose and Allose are naturally occurring sugars. Allulose can be found in figs, kiwis and raisins. Tagatose in dairy products, and Allose in the leaves of the African shrub protea rubropilosa. While both Glucose and Fructose are abundant in nature, Allulose, Tagatose and Allose are considered rare sugars since they are frustratingly scarce. 

 

 

I DON'T CONSUME SUGAR.  WHY DOES THIS MATTER TO ME?

While you may be jumping on the bandwagon of the newest low-sugar diet craze, the truth is it’s actually quite challenging to avoid consumption of added sugars.  There are 61 different names for sugar used by F&B companies, which makes it easy to hide sugar in plain sight. Moreover, the use of added sugar is very common and covers a wide range of products. In the US for example, 74% of the packaged food found at your local store contains added sugar.

OK, I'M CONVINCED, SO WHERE CAN I BUY THEM?

To date, there is no commercially viable manufacturing process to produce rare sugars.  Bio-production of Allulose and Tagatose using natural enzymes has failed to reach economic viability due to an unfavorable reaction equilibrium that requires a complicated separation process.

 

That’s where we come in. By introducing our new enzymes, we can significantly improve the production process of rare sugars, and make them more commercially accessible.

WHY RARE SUGARS?

Rare sugars such as Allulose, Tagatose and Allose are considered ideal sugar replacements because they have a similar taste profile and sweetness to sugar, but don’t have the aftertaste of many artificial sugars. In addition, rare sugars also share similar technical and textural characteristics with natural sugars.

Remarkably, those qualities come with very low to nearly no caloric value.  For example, Allulose and Tagatose provide only 0.3% and 40%, respectively, of the per-weight calorie value of sucrose.

I HAVE DIABETES, ARE RARE SUGARS SAFE TO CONSUME?

In contrast to other sugar replacement solutions, rare sugars have virtually no effect on blood glucose or insulin levels. According to the FDA, both are considered safe to consume for all populations, including diabetic patients.

In fact, extensive scientific evidence demonstrates that rare sugars can actually positively affect our health. Allulose, for example, can reduce the absorption of other sugars, elevate glycogen synthesis, improve glucose and insulin response, and induce fat oxidation.  

WHY NOT USE STEVIA OR ASPARTAME INSTEAD?

Natural or chemical high-intensity sweeteners (HISs), such as aspartame or stevia, can indeed alleviate the craving for a sweet taste, but they do so with a few problems and caveats.

For instance, most HISs are hyper-sweet, unlike sucrose (table sugar), and often possess an unpleasant aftertaste. Additionally, natural and artificial sweeteners are chemically different from sucrose, resulting in a different consistency, heat-response profile, and ability to naturally react with other food ingredients.  As a result, existing recipes and food-manufacturing processes must be radically altered when replacing sucrose with HISs.